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Brexit Negotiations Unnecessarily Suffering

In All, Brexit by Adam

One of the biggest problems with politics is politicians. It might sound like an obvious thing to say, but it is most frighteningly true when it comes to the Brexit Negotiations. Having a snap general election just before negotiations were due to open only really had one intention. And it was not democratic. The intention behind the election was undemocratic and somewhat cynical. Theresa May wanted to place herself in a position of a stronger majority with the sole purpose of being able to push through her own agenda unchallenged. However, this would not necessarily be in the best interests of the country. What if part of the negotiations favoured one element of UK society but disadvantaged another? Surely that would not, therefore, be in the best interests of the whole UK and should there be challenged by the opposition. Let’s give …

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True Migration Value – Why the UK Economy is under Threat

In All, Brexit, British Citizenship, EU Referendum, EU Workers by Adam

Few people really appreciate the Migration Value in the UK, and rely of the usual bigoted remarks from the media to spur on the narratives we here. The whole EU referendum was debated and decided on the basis of a simplistic “either/or” which opened it up to ideological abuse. It meant that no-one really needed to explain anything: they just threw insult and jibes and hoped for the best. But we didn’t get the “best” in any way. Put aside individual voting preferences and you see both sides of the referendum lost out. 48% of the nation are lumbered with something they don’t want. Even worse, they will now never get to know what the reformed alternative could have been. We’ve been left with a situation where the fight seems to be more about allowing Brexit to do as little …

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Labour’s Manifesto for the Many

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

As an organisation, UK Immigration Solicitors has no political bias, but what we do have is a clear awareness about how the political landscape affects people who require immigration support. As such, we take great interest in how the general election — just like Brexit — will affect our clients, and how the Labour Manifesto could play a major part in this. Labour’s manifesto has shown a very interesting narrative being drawn out by the Labour party. They clearly make one statement with regards to Brexit and immigration: “A Labour government will immediately guarantee existing rights for all EU nationals living in Britain and secure reciprocal rights for UK citizens who have chosen to make their lives in EU countries. EU nationals do not just contribute to our society: they are part of our society. And they should not be used as bargaining chips. …

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The President Macron win could mean a Harder Brexit for May

In All, Brexit, Elections, Immigration by Adam

Finally, we see an election won by a clear majority that spells out a stronger mandate for the elected president. At 65/35 is is much easier for Macron  to phrase his win as a success for the French people. Macron also sees it as a success for Europe, and that is why it could have a major effect on Brexit. The President of France is a title and position that was always likely to play a significant role in Brexit negotiations. Part of that is down to their role in the EU. A bigger part of it comes down to their relationship with the UK, politically and physically. Although not strictly a “land border” with the UK, France is the only country with a land connection. The Macron Immigration View Macron had a clear view on immigration, favouring the integration of …

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The Brexit Timeline

In All, Article 50, Brexit by Adam

We’ve put together a timeline of all the key dates and events leading up to the UK EU Referendum and months that have followed it. Nearly two years of campaigns, debates, elections and resignations. We invite you to take a few minutes to enjoy the information, images and short videos mapping out the journey so far. For better or for worse? That has yet to be seen. So let’s begin by stepping back almost two years to 2015 when the UK was in the throws of a general election… David Cameron announces the official beginning of the General Election of 2015. He makes promises about moving forward. The leaders of the seven major parties engage in a live TV debate – the only one that David Cameron agreed to. The Conservatives win the election by a majority of 331 seats, …

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Dirty Democracy: Devaluing the Voters’ Voice

In All, Brexit, Immigration by Adam

When the British people get a rare opportunity to play “democracy” on anything as significant as the EU Referendum, we should be able to rely on truth and factual accuracy in order to make an informed choice. Sadly, that is not the case in British Politics, which is driven more by populist media than cogent argument. It was only well after the referendum that we finally had the admissions: “No we won’t get £350m a week for the NHS.” “No, Brexit will not allow us to curb immigration.” “Sorry, I forgot to mention we always have had sovereignty” UK immigration law is a very complex and ever-changing area of law. It’s also really expensive, especially for non-EU/EEA visitors and workers – who make up more of the net migration figures than our EU counterparts. Nevertheless, immigration was at the forefront of many …

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General Election Immigration Promises are Easily Made

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

The problem with making promises in elections and manifestos is that they have to be kept. The next problem is that so rarely are kept. The next problem is that there is no real recourse for politicians in a General Election for when they don’t keep the promises. By the time anyone gets to find out that the promise won’t be kept it is too late and we’re stuck with it for five years. This snap general election has moved the goalposts, throwing us into another very quick process with little time to make big decisions. Many have accused the Tories of being somewhat cynical in their presumption that the “cat is in the bag” given their lead in the polls. But you shouldn’t put cats in bags. It’s cruel. Especially not when there is a chance the bag might …

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Brexit Hacker? Cyber Attacker? Or just a System Cracker?

In All, Brexit by Adam

I like a good conspiracy theory – usually more for amusement than to take seriously. Surely if there was any possible truth behind a Brexit Hacker story we’d have to wonder why no-one mentioned it a little bit sooner. Perhaps…before Article 50 was triggered? True to form in the UK, there had to be a protracted inquiry costing huge amounts of tax payer money, and producing a document that only those immune from jargon-induced comas would be bothered to read. And the net result is little more than a shrug of the shoulders and a mild – but quite pertinent – stab at the resignation of David Cameron. After the accusations that Russia had interfered with the US Presidential elections I have only managed to muster up an apathetic sigh at this attempt to scream “fix” from the “Remain” side. It …

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What is the Cost of a Free Movement Deal?

In All, Brexit, Free Movement, Immigration by Adam

One of the main problems with juggling the Free Movement Deal post Brexit is that Theresa May keeps moving the goal posts. Whether it was about a “Hard Brexit” .v. “Soft Brexit” or the problem of broken promises, the whole experience with Brexit so far has been one of inconsistency. Consistently. It’s been a long, slow and difficult slog so far, dragging ourselves to Article 50, having that bill “ping pong” with the Lords, and finally triggering it. New hurdles have come up along the way, but none larger – in the eyes of the media and public – than the thorny subject of immigration. However, that is only because the Tories made outlandish claims in their election manifesto, and the Brexit campaign really turned up the heat on anti-immigration propaganda. Free Movement Deal? What will “the people” think? Or do …

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Will the Brexit NHS become a Private issue?

In All, Brexit, EU Workers by Adam

It wasn’t that long ago that a lot of people assumed that the UK would never actually vote for Brexit, especially Cameron and his ministers. That would explain why they had no contingency plan whatsoever. But it wouldn’t do anything to explain why the Brexit NHS seems doomed to collapse – maybe even before the two years are up. The Health Service Journal has made it crystal clear to the government that the risks to Brexit NHS is grave, and that shortages in nurses alone are on route to being between 26,000 and 42,000 by 2025. Yes, I know: big numbers projected years ahead are fantastical and useless – but humour me. The reason for this shortage? One of the principal causes is going to be all down to what the Brexit NHS is going to look like. If UK immigration …