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Brexit Negotiations Unnecessarily Suffering

In All, Brexit by Adam

One of the biggest problems with politics is politicians. It might sound like an obvious thing to say, but it is most frighteningly true when it comes to the Brexit Negotiations. Having a snap general election just before negotiations were due to open only really had one intention. And it was not democratic. The intention behind the election was undemocratic and somewhat cynical. Theresa May wanted to place herself in a position of a stronger majority with the sole purpose of being able to push through her own agenda unchallenged. However, this would not necessarily be in the best interests of the country. What if part of the negotiations favoured one element of UK society but disadvantaged another? Surely that would not, therefore, be in the best interests of the whole UK and should there be challenged by the opposition. Let’s give …

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True Migration Value – Why the UK Economy is under Threat

In All, Brexit, British Citizenship, EU Referendum, EU Workers by Adam

Few people really appreciate the Migration Value in the UK, and rely of the usual bigoted remarks from the media to spur on the narratives we here. The whole EU referendum was debated and decided on the basis of a simplistic “either/or” which opened it up to ideological abuse. It meant that no-one really needed to explain anything: they just threw insult and jibes and hoped for the best. But we didn’t get the “best” in any way. Put aside individual voting preferences and you see both sides of the referendum lost out. 48% of the nation are lumbered with something they don’t want. Even worse, they will now never get to know what the reformed alternative could have been. We’ve been left with a situation where the fight seems to be more about allowing Brexit to do as little …

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The Sun: News or Dangerous Media Fear-mongering?

In All, Elections, Immigration by Adam

I don’t read The Sun. Besides the crass treatment of all news, language level of the average 8 year old, and a target readership of the ignorant and ill-informed, I just don’t wish to endorse the narratives they stir. At UK Immigration Solicitors we are politically neutral since it is only immigration law that we focus on. Therefore, regardless of which party is in power, our solicitors will position themselves at the front of current immigration law. However, we have to remain aware of the climate around us and how that might affect the way the Home Office might change its approach to the law. That’s why it doesn’t help anyone when newspapers like The Sun print front pages like this: It has been very clear for some time now that the media have been set against Jeremy Corbyn. First, they called …

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Labour’s Manifesto for the Many

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

As an organisation, UK Immigration Solicitors has no political bias, but what we do have is a clear awareness about how the political landscape affects people who require immigration support. As such, we take great interest in how the general election — just like Brexit — will affect our clients, and how the Labour Manifesto could play a major part in this. Labour’s manifesto has shown a very interesting narrative being drawn out by the Labour party. They clearly make one statement with regards to Brexit and immigration: “A Labour government will immediately guarantee existing rights for all EU nationals living in Britain and secure reciprocal rights for UK citizens who have chosen to make their lives in EU countries. EU nationals do not just contribute to our society: they are part of our society. And they should not be used as bargaining chips. …

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The President Macron win could mean a Harder Brexit for May

In All, Brexit, Elections, Immigration by Adam

Finally, we see an election won by a clear majority that spells out a stronger mandate for the elected president. At 65/35 is is much easier for Macron  to phrase his win as a success for the French people. Macron also sees it as a success for Europe, and that is why it could have a major effect on Brexit. The President of France is a title and position that was always likely to play a significant role in Brexit negotiations. Part of that is down to their role in the EU. A bigger part of it comes down to their relationship with the UK, politically and physically. Although not strictly a “land border” with the UK, France is the only country with a land connection. The Macron Immigration View Macron had a clear view on immigration, favouring the integration of …

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The Brexit Timeline

In All, Article 50, Brexit by Adam

We’ve put together a timeline of all the key dates and events leading up to the UK EU Referendum and months that have followed it. Nearly two years of campaigns, debates, elections and resignations. We invite you to take a few minutes to enjoy the information, images and short videos mapping out the journey so far. For better or for worse? That has yet to be seen. So let’s begin by stepping back almost two years to 2015 when the UK was in the throws of a general election… David Cameron announces the official beginning of the General Election of 2015. He makes promises about moving forward. The leaders of the seven major parties engage in a live TV debate – the only one that David Cameron agreed to. The Conservatives win the election by a majority of 331 seats, …

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Dirty Democracy: Devaluing the Voters’ Voice

In All, Brexit, Immigration by Adam

When the British people get a rare opportunity to play “democracy” on anything as significant as the EU Referendum, we should be able to rely on truth and factual accuracy in order to make an informed choice. Sadly, that is not the case in British Politics, which is driven more by populist media than cogent argument. It was only well after the referendum that we finally had the admissions: “No we won’t get £350m a week for the NHS.” “No, Brexit will not allow us to curb immigration.” “Sorry, I forgot to mention we always have had sovereignty” UK immigration law is a very complex and ever-changing area of law. It’s also really expensive, especially for non-EU/EEA visitors and workers – who make up more of the net migration figures than our EU counterparts. Nevertheless, immigration was at the forefront of many …

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General Election Immigration Promises are Easily Made

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

The problem with making promises in elections and manifestos is that they have to be kept. The next problem is that so rarely are kept. The next problem is that there is no real recourse for politicians in a General Election for when they don’t keep the promises. By the time anyone gets to find out that the promise won’t be kept it is too late and we’re stuck with it for five years. This snap general election has moved the goalposts, throwing us into another very quick process with little time to make big decisions. Many have accused the Tories of being somewhat cynical in their presumption that the “cat is in the bag” given their lead in the polls. But you shouldn’t put cats in bags. It’s cruel. Especially not when there is a chance the bag might …

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Overseas Students Count: but should they be Counted?

In All, Student Visas, Tier 4 by Adam

The argument about overseas students being counted in migration statistics is another one of those debates that is essentially more about point-scoring than it is of any real use. If the students are removed from the stats it would facilitate a sudden massive drop in migration numbers. However, it would also give a very skewed idea of the real number of people migrating to the UK. When overseas students, especially at higher education level, come to the UK they have to pay astonishingly high tuition fees. They also have to pay for their visa applications, and of course cover all the costs of the physical move. So it is fair to say they truly invest in their education, and they do so – in the most part – with every intention of applying that education to their lives and careers. These …

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Elections: Whose Voice is Really Heard?

In All, Elections by Adam

It’s fair to say that these past two years have been busy on the elections front. It started with the General Election 2015, in which we were promised a referendum as if it was something we all wanted. Then in June 2016 we held the EU referendum after months of divisive and somewhat factually questionable campaigning. These two elections put the UK into a very precarious political position, especially when it came to using the word “win” or “mandate.” The Tories had got into power by a slither of a majority, and with just 25% of the electorate voting for them. Yet, due to our First Past the Post voting system, that was enough to hand power to the Tories. But it’s hardly a mandate for saying that the party truly represents the public. The same then happened with Brexit. As a …

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Asylum Appeals are not all Criminal Master Plans

In All, Appeals, Asylum by Adam

One of the main problems with commenting on two issues at the same time is that the readers will understandably presume a connection. As Sky News reported the new Fast-Tracking for Asylum Appeals cases, they also bundled this in with criminal cases. The net result: a narrative that pushes people to presume the negative view of Asylum seekers. When people apply for Asylum they are basically saying: “help me.” This might be a cry for help against oppression and persecution, sometimes even death. One such example might be, if we believe the media coverage, a homosexual person from Chechnya coming to the UK in genuine fear of their life. They might bring their family with them, fearing for their safety, too. Most decent human beings would hold their hands out and offer help. Asylum is never meant to be a …

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Spouse Visa Refusal: Feeling a World Apart

In All, Appeals, Brexit by Adam

One of the most challenging sides of UK immigration law is to understand that no matter how strongly you feel, how much you love, or how hard you work…in the end, a decision is made by someone who will judge your application solely on the basis of the information you provide. When it comes to spouses wanting to live and settle together in the UK, a Spouse Visa Refusal can feel like an exceptionally personal attack. But it isn’t. It is just “business.” And it is a business the UK Home Office is making a lot of money out of. Spouse Visa Refusals – why do they happen? As with a great many visa refusals, Spouse Visa Refusals general occur when the Home Office have found any slight detail on your application that they can claim fails to meet requirements. Often …

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The Appeal of the UK: the cost of Freedom and Liberty

In All, Appeals, Brexit, Immigration, Uncategorized by Adam

Buried deep beneath the murky underwater of the issue of migration in the UK is a more troubling trend in the cost of justice in the UK.  Filing a visa application is hard enough without having to worry about the cost of funding an an appeal if the visa is refused. It appears that “freedom” and “liberty” have a price. Migration brings an approximate net wealth of about £2billion a year to the UK, so despite some claims to the contrary, it is not a drain on the economy or the public purse. Brexit might well have provided some hope for people who want a more EU-red-tape-free society, but the cost is an entirely different matter.  Some of the migration rules that apply to non-EU or non-EEA countries could start affecting EU migration.  In fact, this is what people are …

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The Brexit Timeline

In All, Article 50, Brexit by Adam

We’ve put together a timeline of all the key dates and events leading up to the UK EU Referendum and months that have followed it. Nearly two years of campaigns, debates, elections and resignations. We invite you to take a few minutes to enjoy the information, images and short videos mapping out the journey so far. For better or for worse? That has yet to be seen. So let’s begin by stepping back almost two years to 2015 when the UK was in the throws of a general election… David Cameron announces the official beginning of the General Election of 2015. He makes promises about moving forward. The leaders of the seven major parties engage in a live TV debate – the only one that David Cameron agreed to. The Conservatives win the election by a majority of 331 seats, …

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Brexit EU Worker Plans: Buildings, Bulldozers & Broken Promises

In All, Article 50, Brexit Plan, EU Workers by Adam

The problem with this whole issue is that it falls outside the control of the trade part of the issue and into the politicised immigration issue. Dealing with that issue gets tied up in knots. No-one really knows what the Brexit EU worker plans are. Every time I consider the issue of EU nationals currently in the UK, I always come back to the same concern of a possible catch-22 situation arising. Whatever the Brexit EU worker plans are, it has to be something that we consider carefully rather than bulldozer through Article 50. The impact on UK industry is potentially vast, and expecting the public of the UK and EU to sit on their hands for two years is, frankly, ridiculous. By letting the whole EU referendum be distracted by Nigel Farage posing in front of propaganda dominated by …

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Article 50 Triggered: Have We Shot Ourselves in the Foot?

In All, Article 50, Brexit by Adam

The simple fact with Article 50 and the whole act of getting Brexit underway is that we do not know what will happen over the next two years, with any certainty. However, that shouldn’t negate the need to have a good idea of what could happen, or what plans we want to put forward. In Prime Minister’s Question time today, Angus Robertson asked the PM about the promise she had made to discuss with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland the details of the plan before triggering Article 50. Which she didn’t. So that was another promise broken by the PM. Article 50 is all a matter of trust Trust is a really big problem for Brexit, and it has been throughout the campaigns leading up the referendum. The £350m promise on the side of a bus has become almost synonymous with the …

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Why are Brexit Plans So Secret?

In All, Article 50, Brexit, Brexit Plan by Adam

What are the Brexit Plans? We’re constantly reminded that we live in a democracy. We’re always being told that “Brexit” is the “will of the people.” That’s why no matter how close the vote was, we must go forth with the Brexit plans. But what are they? The BBC televised a 90-minute question time yesterday all about Brexit. I lasted 10 minutes. It’s not that I am disinterested or that I don’t feel it is relevant – far from it – I am just tired of hearing politicians dodging answering simple questions. How can we claim to live in a democracy if the people that we elect to represent us take liberties with such responsibility and do everything behind closed doors? How can I be even slightly confident about the way the government will handle the Brexit Plans if I …

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Pulling the Brexit Trigger: Who Will Pay the Penalty?

In All, Article 50, Brexit, Brexit Plan by Adam

Brexit Trigger: taking the shot Imagine that pulling the Brexit Trigger was all just a huge game of football. Not just any game, though: the deciding game that could see the Away team relegated if they lose. The Away team arrive on their big blue bus, parking next to the Home team have bus, which has been painted with a slogan about winning by 350 goals on the side. It seems an outlandish claim, and nothing is given to show it is even possible: but still it glares at them. ‘Swarms’ of Away fans – who have a reputation for taking up much needed seats in the ground, eating all the food, and bringing violence and crime to the game – arrive at the ground peacefully, ready to get the game going. The Game begins. Twenty-two players run around a field, frantically kicking a …

See All Article 50 Posts
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Asylum Appeals are not all Criminal Master Plans

In All, Appeals, Asylum by Adam

One of the main problems with commenting on two issues at the same time is that the readers will understandably presume a connection. As Sky News reported the new Fast-Tracking for Asylum Appeals cases, they also bundled this in with criminal cases. The net result: a narrative that pushes people to presume the negative view of Asylum seekers. When people apply for Asylum they are basically saying: “help me.” This might be a cry for help against oppression and persecution, sometimes even death. One such example might be, if we believe the media coverage, a homosexual person from Chechnya coming to the UK in genuine fear of their life. They might bring their family with them, fearing for their safety, too. Most decent human beings would hold their hands out and offer help. Asylum is never meant to be a …

See All Asylum Posts
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Brexit Negotiations Unnecessarily Suffering

In All, Brexit by Adam

One of the biggest problems with politics is politicians. It might sound like an obvious thing to say, but it is most frighteningly true when it comes to the Brexit Negotiations. Having a snap general election just before negotiations were due to open only really had one intention. And it was not democratic. The intention behind the election was undemocratic and somewhat cynical. Theresa May wanted to place herself in a position of a stronger majority with the sole purpose of being able to push through her own agenda unchallenged. However, this would not necessarily be in the best interests of the country. What if part of the negotiations favoured one element of UK society but disadvantaged another? Surely that would not, therefore, be in the best interests of the whole UK and should there be challenged by the opposition. Let’s give …

View Post

True Migration Value – Why the UK Economy is under Threat

In All, Brexit, British Citizenship, EU Referendum, EU Workers by Adam

Few people really appreciate the Migration Value in the UK, and rely of the usual bigoted remarks from the media to spur on the narratives we here. The whole EU referendum was debated and decided on the basis of a simplistic “either/or” which opened it up to ideological abuse. It meant that no-one really needed to explain anything: they just threw insult and jibes and hoped for the best. But we didn’t get the “best” in any way. Put aside individual voting preferences and you see both sides of the referendum lost out. 48% of the nation are lumbered with something they don’t want. Even worse, they will now never get to know what the reformed alternative could have been. We’ve been left with a situation where the fight seems to be more about allowing Brexit to do as little …

View Post

Labour’s Manifesto for the Many

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

As an organisation, UK Immigration Solicitors has no political bias, but what we do have is a clear awareness about how the political landscape affects people who require immigration support. As such, we take great interest in how the general election — just like Brexit — will affect our clients, and how the Labour Manifesto could play a major part in this. Labour’s manifesto has shown a very interesting narrative being drawn out by the Labour party. They clearly make one statement with regards to Brexit and immigration: “A Labour government will immediately guarantee existing rights for all EU nationals living in Britain and secure reciprocal rights for UK citizens who have chosen to make their lives in EU countries. EU nationals do not just contribute to our society: they are part of our society. And they should not be used as bargaining chips. …

View Post

The President Macron win could mean a Harder Brexit for May

In All, Brexit, Elections, Immigration by Adam

Finally, we see an election won by a clear majority that spells out a stronger mandate for the elected president. At 65/35 is is much easier for Macron  to phrase his win as a success for the French people. Macron also sees it as a success for Europe, and that is why it could have a major effect on Brexit. The President of France is a title and position that was always likely to play a significant role in Brexit negotiations. Part of that is down to their role in the EU. A bigger part of it comes down to their relationship with the UK, politically and physically. Although not strictly a “land border” with the UK, France is the only country with a land connection. The Macron Immigration View Macron had a clear view on immigration, favouring the integration of …

View Post

The Brexit Timeline

In All, Article 50, Brexit by Adam

We’ve put together a timeline of all the key dates and events leading up to the UK EU Referendum and months that have followed it. Nearly two years of campaigns, debates, elections and resignations. We invite you to take a few minutes to enjoy the information, images and short videos mapping out the journey so far. For better or for worse? That has yet to be seen. So let’s begin by stepping back almost two years to 2015 when the UK was in the throws of a general election… David Cameron announces the official beginning of the General Election of 2015. He makes promises about moving forward. The leaders of the seven major parties engage in a live TV debate – the only one that David Cameron agreed to. The Conservatives win the election by a majority of 331 seats, …

View Post

Dirty Democracy: Devaluing the Voters’ Voice

In All, Brexit, Immigration by Adam

When the British people get a rare opportunity to play “democracy” on anything as significant as the EU Referendum, we should be able to rely on truth and factual accuracy in order to make an informed choice. Sadly, that is not the case in British Politics, which is driven more by populist media than cogent argument. It was only well after the referendum that we finally had the admissions: “No we won’t get £350m a week for the NHS.” “No, Brexit will not allow us to curb immigration.” “Sorry, I forgot to mention we always have had sovereignty” UK immigration law is a very complex and ever-changing area of law. It’s also really expensive, especially for non-EU/EEA visitors and workers – who make up more of the net migration figures than our EU counterparts. Nevertheless, immigration was at the forefront of many …

View Post

General Election Immigration Promises are Easily Made

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

The problem with making promises in elections and manifestos is that they have to be kept. The next problem is that so rarely are kept. The next problem is that there is no real recourse for politicians in a General Election for when they don’t keep the promises. By the time anyone gets to find out that the promise won’t be kept it is too late and we’re stuck with it for five years. This snap general election has moved the goalposts, throwing us into another very quick process with little time to make big decisions. Many have accused the Tories of being somewhat cynical in their presumption that the “cat is in the bag” given their lead in the polls. But you shouldn’t put cats in bags. It’s cruel. Especially not when there is a chance the bag might …

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Brexit Hacker? Cyber Attacker? Or just a System Cracker?

In All, Brexit by Adam

I like a good conspiracy theory – usually more for amusement than to take seriously. Surely if there was any possible truth behind a Brexit Hacker story we’d have to wonder why no-one mentioned it a little bit sooner. Perhaps…before Article 50 was triggered? True to form in the UK, there had to be a protracted inquiry costing huge amounts of tax payer money, and producing a document that only those immune from jargon-induced comas would be bothered to read. And the net result is little more than a shrug of the shoulders and a mild – but quite pertinent – stab at the resignation of David Cameron. After the accusations that Russia had interfered with the US Presidential elections I have only managed to muster up an apathetic sigh at this attempt to scream “fix” from the “Remain” side. It …

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What is the Cost of a Free Movement Deal?

In All, Brexit, Free Movement, Immigration by Adam

One of the main problems with juggling the Free Movement Deal post Brexit is that Theresa May keeps moving the goal posts. Whether it was about a “Hard Brexit” .v. “Soft Brexit” or the problem of broken promises, the whole experience with Brexit so far has been one of inconsistency. Consistently. It’s been a long, slow and difficult slog so far, dragging ourselves to Article 50, having that bill “ping pong” with the Lords, and finally triggering it. New hurdles have come up along the way, but none larger – in the eyes of the media and public – than the thorny subject of immigration. However, that is only because the Tories made outlandish claims in their election manifesto, and the Brexit campaign really turned up the heat on anti-immigration propaganda. Free Movement Deal? What will “the people” think? Or do …

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Will the Brexit NHS become a Private issue?

In All, Brexit, EU Workers by Adam

It wasn’t that long ago that a lot of people assumed that the UK would never actually vote for Brexit, especially Cameron and his ministers. That would explain why they had no contingency plan whatsoever. But it wouldn’t do anything to explain why the Brexit NHS seems doomed to collapse – maybe even before the two years are up. The Health Service Journal has made it crystal clear to the government that the risks to Brexit NHS is grave, and that shortages in nurses alone are on route to being between 26,000 and 42,000 by 2025. Yes, I know: big numbers projected years ahead are fantastical and useless – but humour me. The reason for this shortage? One of the principal causes is going to be all down to what the Brexit NHS is going to look like. If UK immigration …

See All Brexit Posts
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Brexit EU Worker Plans: Buildings, Bulldozers & Broken Promises

In All, Article 50, Brexit Plan, EU Workers by Adam

The problem with this whole issue is that it falls outside the control of the trade part of the issue and into the politicised immigration issue. Dealing with that issue gets tied up in knots. No-one really knows what the Brexit EU worker plans are. Every time I consider the issue of EU nationals currently in the UK, I always come back to the same concern of a possible catch-22 situation arising. Whatever the Brexit EU worker plans are, it has to be something that we consider carefully rather than bulldozer through Article 50. The impact on UK industry is potentially vast, and expecting the public of the UK and EU to sit on their hands for two years is, frankly, ridiculous. By letting the whole EU referendum be distracted by Nigel Farage posing in front of propaganda dominated by …

View Post

Why are Brexit Plans So Secret?

In All, Article 50, Brexit, Brexit Plan by Adam

What are the Brexit Plans? We’re constantly reminded that we live in a democracy. We’re always being told that “Brexit” is the “will of the people.” That’s why no matter how close the vote was, we must go forth with the Brexit plans. But what are they? The BBC televised a 90-minute question time yesterday all about Brexit. I lasted 10 minutes. It’s not that I am disinterested or that I don’t feel it is relevant – far from it – I am just tired of hearing politicians dodging answering simple questions. How can we claim to live in a democracy if the people that we elect to represent us take liberties with such responsibility and do everything behind closed doors? How can I be even slightly confident about the way the government will handle the Brexit Plans if I …

View Post

Pulling the Brexit Trigger: Who Will Pay the Penalty?

In All, Article 50, Brexit, Brexit Plan by Adam

Brexit Trigger: taking the shot Imagine that pulling the Brexit Trigger was all just a huge game of football. Not just any game, though: the deciding game that could see the Away team relegated if they lose. The Away team arrive on their big blue bus, parking next to the Home team have bus, which has been painted with a slogan about winning by 350 goals on the side. It seems an outlandish claim, and nothing is given to show it is even possible: but still it glares at them. ‘Swarms’ of Away fans – who have a reputation for taking up much needed seats in the ground, eating all the food, and bringing violence and crime to the game – arrive at the ground peacefully, ready to get the game going. The Game begins. Twenty-two players run around a field, frantically kicking a …

View Post

UK Immigration Law: Oh Lords!

In All, Brexit, Brexit Plan by Adam

Of the main reasons that a lot of people voted for Brexit, “taking back sovereignty” away from “un-elected officials” in the EU was a popular one. So one has to assume that those voters must be terribly confused by our own House of Lords – who are a full and complete part of our democracy – challenged our sovereign House of Commons over a matter of UK immigration law. What too many don’t know, but they really should… I am often left quite shocked at how little many of the general public understand about our political and legal structure. To be entirely honest, there is no excuse at all for anyone in their late twenties not to have a cursory knowledge given the fact they would have gone through the Citizenship learning introduced to the National Curriculum around 2000 for secondary …

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Brexit Deal: what did we vote for?

In All, Brexit, Brexit Plan by Adam

Time is ticking quickly towards the end of March and Theresa May’s “promise” to trigger Article 50. As long as the House of Lords don’t block the way or demand revisions, it seems a certainty now. Whether we individually voted to leave or remain, Brexit is a reality. The only questions are: what is the plan, and what will the deal be? Brexit alone is not enough: it is the details of the Brexit Deal that matters. The German Foreign Minister, Sigmar Gabriel, has made his thoughts clear on the matter most – and most logically, it would seem. He’s in favour of a sensible, mutually favourable deal since both the UK and the EU (or Germany, for his sake) benefit more from having a constructive Brexit Deal in place. It almost seems like a refreshingly cogent piece of political …

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Brexit Shambles: or a cover for Institutional Racism?

In All, Brexit, Brexit Plan, Immigration by Adam

Theresa May is a very different kind of PM to David Cameron and pretty much all recent male PMs since Blair. She isn’t the “PR” washed, personality-bleached usual character we see at the helm, preened and polished by PR, carrying a great big whip.  No: May is more private, slithery and calculating. And that is why I am not sure I believe Brexit Shambles is all it seems. Martin Kettle wrote a compelling article today (“For Theresa May, immigration matters more than the economy”) highlighting many of the reasons how and why May’s focus seems to be skewed in such a way. However, it still feels that somehow a different kind of narrative is being played, and all the pledges to “unite” are not so sincere. After all, the “all in this together” stance from David Cameron proved to be an …

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Brexit Shambles: Why don’t we listen to our Experts?

In All, Brexit, Brexit Plan by Adam

Sir Ivan Rogers is a remarkably experienced, respected and decorated expert in international negotiations – so much so he was knighted in the 2016 honours list. His resignation from his position in Brussels marks another example of the Brexit Shambles we find ourselves in. It is hard to find anything positive that has been said, or could be said, about the process towards triggering Article 50 in March. “March 2017” might still sound a long way off, but it is merely a few months away now.  Small businesses and the self employed are grimacing at their own Tax Returns with a begrudge, but clearer focus than our own Prime Minister seems to have a handle on… the entire independent future of the whole of the UK. Brexit Shambles?  “Shambles” is such a British word – soon it could turn into …

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Brexit Plan: Stop All the Clocks

In All, Brexit, Brexit Plan, Immigration by Adam

Two years to leave the union; ten years to negotiate trade deals; and 140 years to process the paperwork of current EU migrants residing in the UK post Brexit Plan. Bureaucracy is one thing…but that is just ridiculous. It’s an astonishing amount of time if you consider we currently live in a world that goes utterly crazy if an online video buffers for a matter of seconds.  If the internet goes down and people can’t access online-banking we have the threat of imminent world-ending panic for the hour or so it takes to get it back up and running. Multi-million-pound deals are done in single meetings, or on the floor of the stock exchange all day, every day. How Many Brexiteers does it take to change a…? So why are the media and the politicians trying to wow or worry …

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True Migration Value – Why the UK Economy is under Threat

In All, Brexit, British Citizenship, EU Referendum, EU Workers by Adam

Few people really appreciate the Migration Value in the UK, and rely of the usual bigoted remarks from the media to spur on the narratives we here. The whole EU referendum was debated and decided on the basis of a simplistic “either/or” which opened it up to ideological abuse. It meant that no-one really needed to explain anything: they just threw insult and jibes and hoped for the best. But we didn’t get the “best” in any way. Put aside individual voting preferences and you see both sides of the referendum lost out. 48% of the nation are lumbered with something they don’t want. Even worse, they will now never get to know what the reformed alternative could have been. We’ve been left with a situation where the fight seems to be more about allowing Brexit to do as little …

View Post

British Citizenship Solicitors: Recognising Responsibility over Rights

In All, British Citizenship, EU Referendum by Adam

Having British Citizenship as a mark of identity is not something we often talk about as Brits.  We are a stiff upper lip nation who are more likely to nod politely, and grunt nonchalantly when it comes to national pride. We’re also made up of a group of countries that  have their own national pride. So when it comes to giving legal advice, British Citizenship Solicitors are usually advising more in terms of securing rights to reside, to work, to live. Above all, they are seeking to help people secure a new home and future. That individual identity also feeds into the national identity.  However, British sovereignty became a major factor in the EU referendum, with many people all vying for Britain to take back its sovereignty from the EU. It was a friend of mine who recently asked me what …

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Brexit and British Citizenship: a Compatibility Crisis?

In All, Brexit, British Citizenship by Adam

With Trump’s attitude to immigration ignoring the irony of his own past, there is a great risk that there could be implications for attitudes towards immigration in general. We are no angels either, as I have discussed in previous blogs. Rising visa and appeal prices (and U-turns); increases in salary requirements; guesses on what the EU migration policy will be post-Brexit; all bubbling up tension for what might be coming over the next two years. British Citizenship is looking even more precious than before. In the past we have rubbed shoulders closely with the US quite significantly on many world issues, not least the whole Blair/Bush affair.  Some still blame the current climate of terror on that earlier intervention back in 2001 onwards. The “War On Terror” – as it was named – is still rippling and rumbling, and there are …

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Deportation Crime: Trump’s Racism under Cover of Law

In All, Deportation by Adam

Donald Trump has made quite a show of his anti-immigration stance for quite some time, and it is not always easy to tell whether he is that bigoted or just trying to appeal to an ignorant mass. However, his latest executive action to identify and remove immigrants who have been convicted or just charged of a crime in a weekly list is a new level. Is he committing a’ deportation crime’ of his own, and dressing it as some kind of legal process? Trump is prejudiced. Or he pretends to be prejudiced – I’m not sure which is worse. To specifically target immigrants who have committed crimes, or have been accused, is one of the most ludicrous attempts to scapegoat crime onto the shoulders of immigrants. Moreover, it could even be stepping awfully close to finding an excuse to commit …

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Detention and Deportation: the Devil in Demand?

In All, Deportation by Adam

This morning my email inbox was bombarded by a range of news stories about deportation, detention and the Devil: the Home Office. From government “cover-up” attempts to unfair detention and deportations. It was as if the UK had descended into a new depth of justice depravity overnight. The narrative appeared clear: a woman was facing deportation and leaving her sick child behind, even though she had lived here for 25 years. Moreover, the government was hiding the news by talking about the Budget. It seemed that once again we were seeing a grave injustice being played out. I have recently written a blog questioning the lack of compassion being shown to another woman who faces deportation (Deportation of Compassion) despite having been in the UK for a similar amount of time. I was brought to task by a reader over …

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Deportation of Compassion

In All, Deportation by Adam

We all understand that sometimes deportation is necessary. When people are here illegally; or if they are here on visas but commit serious crimes; or if they over-stay a short visa and try to defy the system. There are dishonest people in the UK who do not have the right to be here and indeed should be deported. Mrs Clennell made the UK her home for 27 years. She married a British man who had two sons. She became his full time carer through his illness – something that our social care system can no longer sufficiently cater for with all the cuts. In those 27  years she returned to her home country for long periods of time to care for her parents. Of course one of the conditions or “rules” of Indefinite Leave to Remain is that the individual doesn’t …

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The Sun: News or Dangerous Media Fear-mongering?

In All, Elections, Immigration by Adam

I don’t read The Sun. Besides the crass treatment of all news, language level of the average 8 year old, and a target readership of the ignorant and ill-informed, I just don’t wish to endorse the narratives they stir. At UK Immigration Solicitors we are politically neutral since it is only immigration law that we focus on. Therefore, regardless of which party is in power, our solicitors will position themselves at the front of current immigration law. However, we have to remain aware of the climate around us and how that might affect the way the Home Office might change its approach to the law. That’s why it doesn’t help anyone when newspapers like The Sun print front pages like this: It has been very clear for some time now that the media have been set against Jeremy Corbyn. First, they called …

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Labour’s Manifesto for the Many

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

As an organisation, UK Immigration Solicitors has no political bias, but what we do have is a clear awareness about how the political landscape affects people who require immigration support. As such, we take great interest in how the general election — just like Brexit — will affect our clients, and how the Labour Manifesto could play a major part in this. Labour’s manifesto has shown a very interesting narrative being drawn out by the Labour party. They clearly make one statement with regards to Brexit and immigration: “A Labour government will immediately guarantee existing rights for all EU nationals living in Britain and secure reciprocal rights for UK citizens who have chosen to make their lives in EU countries. EU nationals do not just contribute to our society: they are part of our society. And they should not be used as bargaining chips. …

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The President Macron win could mean a Harder Brexit for May

In All, Brexit, Elections, Immigration by Adam

Finally, we see an election won by a clear majority that spells out a stronger mandate for the elected president. At 65/35 is is much easier for Macron  to phrase his win as a success for the French people. Macron also sees it as a success for Europe, and that is why it could have a major effect on Brexit. The President of France is a title and position that was always likely to play a significant role in Brexit negotiations. Part of that is down to their role in the EU. A bigger part of it comes down to their relationship with the UK, politically and physically. Although not strictly a “land border” with the UK, France is the only country with a land connection. The Macron Immigration View Macron had a clear view on immigration, favouring the integration of …

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General Election Immigration Promises are Easily Made

In All, Brexit, Elections by Adam

The problem with making promises in elections and manifestos is that they have to be kept. The next problem is that so rarely are kept. The next problem is that there is no real recourse for politicians in a General Election for when they don’t keep the promises. By the time anyone gets to find out that the promise won’t be kept it is too late and we’re stuck with it for five years. This snap general election has moved the goalposts, throwing us into another very quick process with little time to make big decisions. Many have accused the Tories of being somewhat cynical in their presumption that the “cat is in the bag” given their lead in the polls. But you shouldn’t put cats in bags. It’s cruel. Especially not when there is a chance the bag might …

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Elections: Whose Voice is Really Heard?

In All, Elections by Adam

It’s fair to say that these past two years have been busy on the elections front. It started with the General Election 2015, in which we were promised a referendum as if it was something we all wanted. Then in June 2016 we held the EU referendum after months of divisive and somewhat factually questionable campaigning. These two elections put the UK into a very precarious political position, especially when it came to using the word “win” or “mandate.” The Tories had got into power by a slither of a majority, and with just 25% of the electorate voting for them. Yet, due to our First Past the Post voting system, that was enough to hand power to the Tories. But it’s hardly a mandate for saying that the party truly represents the public. The same then happened with Brexit. As a …

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True Migration Value – Why the UK Economy is under Threat

In All, Brexit, British Citizenship, EU Referendum, EU Workers by Adam

Few people really appreciate the Migration Value in the UK, and rely of the usual bigoted remarks from the media to spur on the narratives we here. The whole EU referendum was debated and decided on the basis of a simplistic “either/or” which opened it up to ideological abuse. It meant that no-one really needed to explain anything: they just threw insult and jibes and hoped for the best. But we didn’t get the “best” in any way. Put aside individual voting preferences and you see both sides of the referendum lost out. 48% of the nation are lumbered with something they don’t want. Even worse, they will now never get to know what the reformed alternative could have been. We’ve been left with a situation where the fight seems to be more about allowing Brexit to do as little …

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Brexit Democracy already being Questioned

In All, Brexit, EU Referendum by Adam

Article 50 was triggered just yesterday and I already have a question about the romanticism of ‘Brexit Democracy’. Surely eyebrows should be raised by the idea that hundreds or even thousands of EU Laws will be rushed through into UK law without our sovereign parliament’s involvement or vote. To be honest I am angry that I first learn about this from an article in the Independent article Brexit will see 1,000 new laws passed into British law with no parliamentary scrutiny. I am in two minds about this. Part of me wants to express relief that substantial time will not be wasted on so many laws that pretty much just need a Microsoft Word “Replace All” from EU to UK. However, the other part of my mind is very concerned by the idea of these going unchecked. And that comes from my own …

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Why a Second Referendum Could Just Repeat the Same Mistake

In All, Brexit, EU Referendum, Poll by Adam

There were calls for a second Referendum since approximately…the 24th of June 2016. Most of those calls have no doubt come from those who felt bitter about the loss. However, there is a lot of intelligent and considered thought – which only ever seems to happen in hindsight – about the nature of the original referendum and the problems it showed. If we just had a second referendum we could end up repeating the same mistakes. I have discussed the problem of the way the referendum ran and ended before, especially since the knife-edge result was seen in the Scottish independence and the American presidential elections, too. The the problem lies with the way such a huge and complex decision of constitutional level was left to an “either/or” vote. It was like answering an essay question with a “yes” or a …

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UK Permanent Residency: Poker-Faced Politics

In All, Brexit, EU Referendum, EU Workers, Permanent Residency by Adam

Theresa May has always played her cards close to her chest in her political career, and she has a reputation for standing by her decisions with steely determination. When it comes to the issue of UK Permanent Residency for EU migrants, however, there is growing opposition from cross-party politics that make this episode a bit more tricky. One of the unusual aspects of the EU referendum was how it became a cross-party issue, seeing MPs from all sides being free from the “whip” and able to take the side they preferred. Or rather take the side they genuinely understood represented their constituents’ opinion. The UK Permanent Residency Promise But far beyond the referendum, and even after MPs had crawled back to their own sides – some with tails between their political legs – we now see a different cross-party action …

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Permanent Residency and Job Security: Too much to save the NHS?

In All, EU Referendum by Adam

No-one likes to feel undervalued in their job, and especially not those who work in the caring professions. NHS nurses are no exception to this, and the nursing profession in the NHS. Despite being the best part of eight months since the Brexit vote, EU nationals still have no solid commitment from the government on a guaranteed  grant of Permanent Residency (PR). If there is no promises of a life if the UK how could there being promise of long term commitment from the nurses? After all – could you uproot your entire life to move from the UK to another home in a different country without the guarantee of a future? As a result, it is getting harder for the NHS to market itself to EU nurses simply because of this lack of clarity.  Currently, there are 7000 nurses …

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British Citizenship Solicitors: Recognising Responsibility over Rights

In All, British Citizenship, EU Referendum by Adam

Having British Citizenship as a mark of identity is not something we often talk about as Brits.  We are a stiff upper lip nation who are more likely to nod politely, and grunt nonchalantly when it comes to national pride. We’re also made up of a group of countries that  have their own national pride. So when it comes to giving legal advice, British Citizenship Solicitors are usually advising more in terms of securing rights to reside, to work, to live. Above all, they are seeking to help people secure a new home and future. That individual identity also feeds into the national identity.  However, British sovereignty became a major factor in the EU referendum, with many people all vying for Britain to take back its sovereignty from the EU. It was a friend of mine who recently asked me what …

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True Migration Value – Why the UK Economy is under Threat

In All, Brexit, British Citizenship, EU Referendum, EU Workers by Adam

Few people really appreciate the Migration Value in the UK, and rely of the usual bigoted remarks from the media to spur on the narratives we here. The whole EU referendum was debated and decided on the basis of a simplistic “either/or” which opened it up to ideological abuse. It meant that no-one really needed to explain anything: they just threw insult and jibes and hoped for the best. But we didn’t get the “best” in any way. Put aside individual voting preferences and you see both sides of the referendum lost out. 48% of the nation are lumbered with something they don’t want. Even worse, they will now never get to know what the reformed alternative could have been. We’ve been left with a situation where the fight seems to be more about allowing Brexit to do as little …

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Will the Brexit NHS become a Private issue?

In All, Brexit, EU Workers by Adam

It wasn’t that long ago that a lot of people assumed that the UK would never actually vote for Brexit, especially Cameron and his ministers. That would explain why they had no contingency plan whatsoever. But it wouldn’t do anything to explain why the Brexit NHS seems doomed to collapse – maybe even before the two years are up. The Health Service Journal has made it crystal clear to the government that the risks to Brexit NHS is grave, and that shortages in nurses alone are on route to being between 26,000 and 42,000 by 2025. Yes, I know: big numbers projected years ahead are fantastical and useless – but humour me. The reason for this shortage? One of the principal causes is going to be all down to what the Brexit NHS is going to look like. If UK immigration …

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Brexit EU Worker Plans: Buildings, Bulldozers & Broken Promises

In All, Article 50, Brexit Plan, EU Workers by Adam

The problem with this whole issue is that it falls outside the control of the trade part of the issue and into the politicised immigration issue. Dealing with that issue gets tied up in knots. No-one really knows what the Brexit EU worker plans are. Every time I consider the issue of EU nationals currently in the UK, I always come back to the same concern of a possible catch-22 situation arising. Whatever the Brexit EU worker plans are, it has to be something that we consider carefully rather than bulldozer through Article 50. The impact on UK industry is potentially vast, and expecting the public of the UK and EU to sit on their hands for two years is, frankly, ridiculous. By letting the whole EU referendum be distracted by Nigel Farage posing in front of propaganda dominated by …

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UK Permanent Residency: Poker-Faced Politics

In All, Brexit, EU Referendum, EU Workers, Permanent Residency by Adam

Theresa May has always played her cards close to her chest in her political career, and she has a reputation for standing by her decisions with steely determination. When it comes to the issue of UK Permanent Residency for EU migrants, however, there is growing opposition from cross-party politics that make this episode a bit more tricky. One of the unusual aspects of the EU referendum was how it became a cross-party issue, seeing MPs from all sides being free from the “whip” and able to take the side they preferred. Or rather take the side they genuinely understood represented their constituents’ opinion. The UK Permanent Residency Promise But far beyond the referendum, and even after MPs had crawled back to their own sides – some with tails between their political legs – we now see a different cross-party action …

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Brexit Manufacturing Mess

In All, Brexit, EU Workers by Adam

One of the main concerns a lot of people have always had about Brexit is how it could adversely affect trade with EU countries. Even though that issue cannot be resolved without considering the wider picture, it seems now that post Brexit Manufacturing could be under threat. The recent report that up to one in three manufacturing companies may plan to move at least some of their manufacturing out of the UK after Brexit is not an entirely surprising turn of events. Maybe there a number of reasons for it, too. Brexit Manufacturing – Trade Firstly, let’s consider the trade agreement. We don’t know what deal the UK will have with the EU in two years time, but often companies will be projecting three, four or five years ahead. After all, how else can you set targets and manufacturing goals …

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One Day Without Us

In All, Brexit, EU Workers by Adam

The “One Day Without Us” demonstration across the UK today is a spectacular demonstration of the way the UK is enriched by immigration every day. Whichever way you voted in the EU Referendum, it has to be clear that the UK has been multicultural for generations, and will always be so. Regardless of anyone’s personal opinion about the continued volume of immigration, or the effect and cost on society and the economy, the uncertainty placed on one’s future is not fair. Basic Human Needs Human needs are organised into a simple triangle, according to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. At the very bottom, the very base needs of every human, is the need for food, water, warmth and rest. These basic physical needs make it easy to understand why it is an utter betrayal of the rights of any person, let …

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EU Workers: Cost in Context

In All, Brexit, EU Workers by Adam

So unskilled EU Workers are thrown under the spotlight – and the train – by the national media…again. This time it is the Express running with a headline of:  “Why Brexit MUST bring new visa rules: Unskilled migrants ‘cost UK tax payers over the amount because I really have no idea how they have calculated it..or qualified it. However, what I think is worth questioning is how and why anyone would bother making such and inflammatory statement, even now, well after the Brexit vote. The campaign time to make people angry with migrant workers is a constant issue that vastly pre-dated Brexit. What’s more, we’ve heard all these arguments before. Calls have been made for points based systems before – it’s all old news. Of course, the tune has changed slightly and one has to wonder about the logic behind such …

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What is the Cost of a Free Movement Deal?

In All, Brexit, Free Movement, Immigration by Adam

One of the main problems with juggling the Free Movement Deal post Brexit is that Theresa May keeps moving the goal posts. Whether it was about a “Hard Brexit” .v. “Soft Brexit” or the problem of broken promises, the whole experience with Brexit so far has been one of inconsistency. Consistently. It’s been a long, slow and difficult slog so far, dragging ourselves to Article 50, having that bill “ping pong” with the Lords, and finally triggering it. New hurdles have come up along the way, but none larger – in the eyes of the media and public – than the thorny subject of immigration. However, that is only because the Tories made outlandish claims in their election manifesto, and the Brexit campaign really turned up the heat on anti-immigration propaganda. Free Movement Deal? What will “the people” think? Or do …

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A British Brexit Voice Not Heard

In All, Brexit, Free Movement by Adam

Something isn’t right when it takes a Belgian to call out for protection of British people louder and clearer than our own government. The EU referendum has resulted with a British Brexit from the EU, but Guy Verhofstadt has put his hand up and called for Brits in the EU to be protected. Verhofstadt has been clear on his opinion over the whole referendum, calling it a “disaster” and a “tragedy” – clearly something he feels very strongly about. In fact, he speaks with more blunt honesty than our own leaders who, as they slither around giving a straight answer or daring an opinion.  Usually they reserve the puerile personal attacks on each other for their parliamentary shouting matches. At the moment Theresa May is holding on tight to her insistence that Brits in the EU should be guaranteed their status before …

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Free Movement is Getting Caught in the Net

In All, Brexit, Free Movement by Adam

Considering that net migration was one of the main concerns of the EU referendum, the news that peers have warned that free movement will not reduce immigration numbers must have come as a shock to many. After all, for those who hung on every promise of reduced immigration it might even seem like yet another broken promise. The NHS not getting the £350m per week; the fact that we had never given up sovereignty; news that leaving the EU could prove very expensive… all of these new revelations probably have some Brexit voters reeling, and some Remain voters pulling their hair out in frustration. That’s the problem with running a campaign on media hyperbole and fantastical reporting. Free Movement is going round in circles Surely, if we think logically about this, the EU was never going to give the UK …

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The Sun: News or Dangerous Media Fear-mongering?

In All, Elections, Immigration by Adam

I don’t read The Sun. Besides the crass treatment of all news, language level of the average 8 year old, and a target readership of the ignorant and ill-informed, I just don’t wish to endorse the narratives they stir. At UK Immigration Solicitors we are politically neutral since it is only immigration law that we focus on. Therefore, regardless of which party is in power, our solicitors will position themselves at the front of current immigration law. However, we have to remain aware of the climate around us and how that might affect the way the Home Office might change its approach to the law. That’s why it doesn’t help anyone when newspapers like The Sun print front pages like this: It has been very clear for some time now that the media have been set against Jeremy Corbyn. First, they called …

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The President Macron win could mean a Harder Brexit for May

In All, Brexit, Elections, Immigration by Adam

Finally, we see an election won by a clear majority that spells out a stronger mandate for the elected president. At 65/35 is is much easier for Macron  to phrase his win as a success for the French people. Macron also sees it as a success for Europe, and that is why it could have a major effect on Brexit. The President of France is a title and position that was always likely to play a significant role in Brexit negotiations. Part of that is down to their role in the EU. A bigger part of it comes down to their relationship with the UK, politically and physically. Although not strictly a “land border” with the UK, France is the only country with a land connection. The Macron Immigration View Macron had a clear view on immigration, favouring the integration of …

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Dirty Democracy: Devaluing the Voters’ Voice

In All, Brexit, Immigration by Adam

When the British people get a rare opportunity to play “democracy” on anything as significant as the EU Referendum, we should be able to rely on truth and factual accuracy in order to make an informed choice. Sadly, that is not the case in British Politics, which is driven more by populist media than cogent argument. It was only well after the referendum that we finally had the admissions: “No we won’t get £350m a week for the NHS.” “No, Brexit will not allow us to curb immigration.” “Sorry, I forgot to mention we always have had sovereignty” UK immigration law is a very complex and ever-changing area of law. It’s also really expensive, especially for non-EU/EEA visitors and workers – who make up more of the net migration figures than our EU counterparts. Nevertheless, immigration was at the forefront of many …

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What is the Cost of a Free Movement Deal?

In All, Brexit, Free Movement, Immigration by Adam

One of the main problems with juggling the Free Movement Deal post Brexit is that Theresa May keeps moving the goal posts. Whether it was about a “Hard Brexit” .v. “Soft Brexit” or the problem of broken promises, the whole experience with Brexit so far has been one of inconsistency. Consistently. It’s been a long, slow and difficult slog so far, dragging ourselves to Article 50, having that bill “ping pong” with the Lords, and finally triggering it. New hurdles have come up along the way, but none larger – in the eyes of the media and public – than the thorny subject of immigration. However, that is only because the Tories made outlandish claims in their election manifesto, and the Brexit campaign really turned up the heat on anti-immigration propaganda. Free Movement Deal? What will “the people” think? Or do …

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Net Migration: More than a numbers Game

In All, Brexit, Immigration by Adam

Numbers go up; numbers go down. If there is one thing that you can be certain about with statistics it would be that statistics and never certain. Statistics are just numbers – it’s how they are used that makes the dialogue happen. That is why careful choices are made as to when to use Net migration numbers rather than gross incoming numbers. The news yesterday and today has been filled with the issues of industry being affected by migrants coming and going. We’ve discussed NHS nurses, other skilled workers, and the news was covering agriculture yesterday. We could argue about the value of immigration forever but we would never be able to escape the irony that immigration is a natural part of society.  Donald Trump can close his borders as much as he likes, under the guise of “protecting” his national …

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Spouse Visa: Worth more than just a number?

In All, Immigration, Immigration Politics by Adam

Given the recent action in the Supreme court, the laws surrounding the eligibility for a Spouse Visa might well have been upheld, but at least they have been questioned. We live in an increasingly international world where everything from communication, travel, business and relationships are no longer restricted by geography. The industrial revolution paved the way for a rapid expansion, and the invention of steam engines and then internal combustion engines pushed us further. Commercial air travel stretched us further, and the jet engine pushed us faster. The twentieth century then threw the internet into the mix and really began to change the way the world community interacts and expands. It’s an exciting time to be alive, indeed, and the pace is not slowing. But the fast pace is coming up against a resistance as the world begins to kick back …

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Farage Immigration Logic

In All, Immigration by Adam

North Korea is being led by a crazed despot with his finger on the trigger of nuclear weapons, ready to defend himself if too many people ask questions about his murdered half brother. Well, that’s just one reason he might poise that trigger finger – I am sure he has many others. But still we are distracted by the ramblings of a political caricature: Nigel Farage Immigration Logic pervades our airwaves, leaving blithering non sequiturs in his wake. On his LBC Radio programme, Farage denied having ever been looking for a total Muslim immigration ban, but he supported Donald Trump’s ban on the basis that it gave the new president 90 days in which to decided what it could do to keep America safe. Why they think this is possible in just 90 days if they have spent the past fifteen …

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Muslim Immigration: Security or Irrational Fear?

In All, Immigration, Muslim Immigration by Adam

It is true to say that we live in a politically and socially volatile world. But I refuse to say “these days.” To do so would suggest that historically the world was a peaceful, idealistic, and Utopian. Even the most basic lessons in history would contest that. And yet the negativity towards Islam, and the increased pressures to curtail Muslim Immigration is feeding a narrative that links Islam with danger and violence. I have grown up with Islam in my life for as long as I can remember. Muslim children went to my primary schools and my secondary school; many fellow students at university were Muslim; colleagues in all my work places have been Muslims. And Sikhs, Hindus, Christians, Buddhists, Rastafarians…my life has been a cultural tapestry, and if I might afford myself a moment of personal opinion: I am …

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How to Trump Democracy

In All, Immigration, Refugees by Adam

If getting your head around the effects of Brexit seemed hard enough on its own, what happens when you add the fiery atmosphere of immigration on the international stage now? Donald Trump made some wild claims and venomous promises in his campaign for presidency that a lot of people brushed aside, thinking he could never, or would never follow them through. However,it now appears that Donald Trump has confused the concept of empowerment with that of oppression. He is signing executive orders that serve to alienate many of his own citizens and open them up to dreadful discrimination. Let us not forget that the result was extremely close – just like the Brexit result, and the Scottish independence referendum – so as a leader, Trump is not in fact speaking on behalf of his entire nation. One American has written a …

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Brexit Shambles: or a cover for Institutional Racism?

In All, Brexit, Brexit Plan, Immigration by Adam

Theresa May is a very different kind of PM to David Cameron and pretty much all recent male PMs since Blair. She isn’t the “PR” washed, personality-bleached usual character we see at the helm, preened and polished by PR, carrying a great big whip.  No: May is more private, slithery and calculating. And that is why I am not sure I believe Brexit Shambles is all it seems. Martin Kettle wrote a compelling article today (“For Theresa May, immigration matters more than the economy”) highlighting many of the reasons how and why May’s focus seems to be skewed in such a way. However, it still feels that somehow a different kind of narrative is being played, and all the pledges to “unite” are not so sincere. After all, the “all in this together” stance from David Cameron proved to be an …

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Spouse Visa: Worth more than just a number?

In All, Immigration, Immigration Politics by Adam

Given the recent action in the Supreme court, the laws surrounding the eligibility for a Spouse Visa might well have been upheld, but at least they have been questioned. We live in an increasingly international world where everything from communication, travel, business and relationships are no longer restricted by geography. The industrial revolution paved the way for a rapid expansion, and the invention of steam engines and then internal combustion engines pushed us further. Commercial air travel stretched us further, and the jet engine pushed us faster. The twentieth century then threw the internet into the mix and really began to change the way the world community interacts and expands. It’s an exciting time to be alive, indeed, and the pace is not slowing. But the fast pace is coming up against a resistance as the world begins to kick back …

UKIP Immigration: Puerile Politics?

In All, Brexit, Immigration Politics by Adam

In our democratic society we have representatives who are allegedly educated, but still show astonishing levels of ignorance or arrogance – or perhaps, both – when discussing immigration. UKIP have have been accused of racism on many occasions, and they usually brush it off as merely their opinion. When it comes to the UKIP Immigration attitude if often comes across as a puerile attempt to be inflammatory solely for the sake of an argument. All too often, it is nothing short of racism. UKIP Immigration Confusion John Bickley MP has been retweeting a cartoon that could easily be called offensive, and definitely falls short of being satirical. To claim that Labour is the “party for immigrants” is not only incorrect, it is dangerous when combined with the evident Muslim = Jihadist angle. Immigrants who come to the UK from non-EU countries …

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Walking the NHS into the light: what will a post Brexit NHS look like?

In All, Brexit, Immigration Politics, Work Visa by Adam

Immigration – a burden on NHS recruitment? The burden on the NHS was one of the major issues used as a reason to leave the EU in the recent referendum. Brexit was proposed as one of the solutions as the numbers of immigrants stayed far higher than limits set by the government. Promises of £350m a week were made, and then quickly squirmed out of. Let’s assume a certain bus got a re-spray. This was linked to education and housing in an attempt to make Brexit sound like the only viable solution. However, the NHS has suffered greatly under Conservative power for many years. Substantial and regular cuts have challenged staff numbers in particular. Hospital or department closures have been widespread; redundancies growing; and serious problems in recruitment are brewing. Part of this includes the removal of the training bursary …

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Banking on Brexit: is it time to Invest in the UK?

In All, Brexit, Invest in the UK, Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visas by Adam

I am no expert when it comes to stocks and shares and all the jargon that goes with the financial markets. However, with even a layman’s eye, it looks like this could be a good time to invest in the UK. With a weaker pound, and a buyer’s market developing, investment opportunities for 2017 are emerging since Brexit. It’s important to see through the fog of politics that Brexit is causing because at the moment no-one knows what the final deal will be with regards to trading. More importantly, no-one knows how this will affect immigration from EU and EEA countries, which affects work-forces and trade from EU countries. However, the UK has always had more of its net migration from non-EU/EEA countries, and it is unlikely that this will change anyway. Some of the really big corporate players are considering moving …

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Brexit, Oxford, and a World-Wide Workforce

In All, Brexit, Invest in the UK by Adam

The Brexit Shadow of doubt Brexit has cast shadows of doubt and uncertainty over everything in financial and immigration sectors in the UK.  Increasing numbers of EU migrants in the UK are worried about their status due to the wait to find out what deals will be struck. It’s fair to assume that the EU will want to trade off with insisting the UK accepts free movement of labour in return for access to the market.  That’s not going to happen, though. Politicians are far too concerned with appeasing voters and their demands that immigration numbers are controlled. So let’s take a simple look at what the situation could look like. How much are people really paid? Currently 10.6% of the UK work force – that’s all working people in the UK – are migrants.  This number is made up …

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Hatred and Hot Soup: Brexit Media Survival

In All, Brexit, Media by Adam

There’s a border-splitting surge about to happen. Records numbers of migrants are overrunning the country right now, and all we have is the media to guide us. And we are all going to DIE this weekend. There’s only one thing to do: sharpen the pitch-forks; ignite the burning torches; pull on the thermals; and head out to battle armed with as much hatred and hot-soup as we can. The Newspaper front pages today capture exactly why I don’t read newspapers any more, other than to see what ignorant people think are “facts.”  Or if my copies of the Beano have yet to be delivered. Even The Express bank on people being stupid enough to see a big red “10p” and be duped into thinking that is the price.  That is until the customer reaches the til to find out what it …

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Muslim Immigration: Security or Irrational Fear?

In All, Immigration, Muslim Immigration by Adam

It is true to say that we live in a politically and socially volatile world. But I refuse to say “these days.” To do so would suggest that historically the world was a peaceful, idealistic, and Utopian. Even the most basic lessons in history would contest that. And yet the negativity towards Islam, and the increased pressures to curtail Muslim Immigration is feeding a narrative that links Islam with danger and violence. I have grown up with Islam in my life for as long as I can remember. Muslim children went to my primary schools and my secondary school; many fellow students at university were Muslim; colleagues in all my work places have been Muslims. And Sikhs, Hindus, Christians, Buddhists, Rastafarians…my life has been a cultural tapestry, and if I might afford myself a moment of personal opinion: I am …

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UK Permanent Residency: Poker-Faced Politics

In All, Brexit, EU Referendum, EU Workers, Permanent Residency by Adam

Theresa May has always played her cards close to her chest in her political career, and she has a reputation for standing by her decisions with steely determination. When it comes to the issue of UK Permanent Residency for EU migrants, however, there is growing opposition from cross-party politics that make this episode a bit more tricky. One of the unusual aspects of the EU referendum was how it became a cross-party issue, seeing MPs from all sides being free from the “whip” and able to take the side they preferred. Or rather take the side they genuinely understood represented their constituents’ opinion. The UK Permanent Residency Promise But far beyond the referendum, and even after MPs had crawled back to their own sides – some with tails between their political legs – we now see a different cross-party action …

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Bad Permanent Residency Refusals are Worse than just Bad PR

In All, Permanent Residency by Adam

Sometimes I really wonder if the Conservatives are on some kind of Public Relations self-destruct mission, hell-bent on ensuring that they never get elected again. With the number of Permanent Residency Refusals mixed in with the callous cutting of various welfare, care, public service and education budgets, surely no-one with any sense could vote for them. No-one with integrity: surely? Bruno Pollet and his family are a case in point. They are a family like so many in the UK: made up of a British Citizen, their EU national spouse, and a child or children – who by default have British Citizenship.  Bruno moved to the UK from France over twenty-five years ago and married Emma – a Scottish Brit – just six years ago. He’s a highly qualified professor of energy and environment in Ulster and a researcher for …

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Permanent Residency: Unplanned, Uncertain and Unfair

In All, Brexit, Permanent Residency by Adam

Ever since we were all jolted upright by the Brexit result we have been waiting to hear plans of how it might affect all our lives in the UK. However, when it comes to EU nationals currently living and working in the UK, the uncertainty of their future must be a constant worry. There is still no guarantee that they will even be afforded automatic Permanent Residency (PR). It has been hinted at and suggested, but without any promise on the table millions of people are stuck in limbo. Permanent Residency can only be applied for by an EU national with five or more years living in the UK, under current immigration rules. Even then, PR is not guaranteed and a thorough application has to be made. Under the free movement arrangement EU workers don’t have to opt for or worry …

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Why a Second Referendum Could Just Repeat the Same Mistake

In All, Brexit, EU Referendum, Poll by Adam

There were calls for a second Referendum since approximately…the 24th of June 2016. Most of those calls have no doubt come from those who felt bitter about the loss. However, there is a lot of intelligent and considered thought – which only ever seems to happen in hindsight – about the nature of the original referendum and the problems it showed. If we just had a second referendum we could end up repeating the same mistakes. I have discussed the problem of the way the referendum ran and ended before, especially since the knife-edge result was seen in the Scottish independence and the American presidential elections, too. The the problem lies with the way such a huge and complex decision of constitutional level was left to an “either/or” vote. It was like answering an essay question with a “yes” or a …

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How to Trump Democracy

In All, Immigration, Refugees by Adam

If getting your head around the effects of Brexit seemed hard enough on its own, what happens when you add the fiery atmosphere of immigration on the international stage now? Donald Trump made some wild claims and venomous promises in his campaign for presidency that a lot of people brushed aside, thinking he could never, or would never follow them through. However,it now appears that Donald Trump has confused the concept of empowerment with that of oppression. He is signing executive orders that serve to alienate many of his own citizens and open them up to dreadful discrimination. Let us not forget that the result was extremely close – just like the Brexit result, and the Scottish independence referendum – so as a leader, Trump is not in fact speaking on behalf of his entire nation. One American has written a …

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Home is Where the Heart Aches (Part 1)

In All, Brexit, Refugees by Adam

One of the most basic human needs we have is a sense of physical safety and comfort. It is instinctive and established before birth.  Somewhere we know we can return to in danger, and somewhere we can protect.  Somewhere we call ‘home’. We can use no end of catchphrases to justify it: “home is where the heart is”; “there’s no place like home”; “home, sweet home” are but a few.  It also doesn’t matter what form that home takes, whether it is a small studio flat, or even a caravan, up to a stately mansion. Anyone who moved house when they were a child can probably remember the emotional upheaval of leaving friends and family; a school; a community.  We remember the tangible – and we adjust and replace them – but what we often fail to understand that what …

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Lest We Forget the Refugees of Today

In All, Immigration, Refugees by Adam

“Lest we forget.”  It is the phrase of remembrance as we honour the memories of those who have lost their lives fight for the freedom of our country and many others.  I think most people – we can only hope – have at least some understanding of this. I cannot speak for any other country, but I know that in the UK there is simply no excuse for anyone educated in a state school not to know about Remembrance Day and remembrance Sunday. Unless there are specific needs reasons why someone has been unable to learn about these dates, to not know about these dates is a true example of ignorance. A Moment of Silence In the minutes of silence shared on the 11th November and the Sunday (if they are not the same day) people must think of many …

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Refugees and the poisonous narrative

In All, Refugees, Uncategorized by Adam

The UK has been dragging its heels on the refugee crisis for well over a year now. It is almost impossible to know how many refugees have fled the east from Syria and other countries, by land and by sea.  However, even though the number is unclear, what we do know is that the variety is not. Men, women and children have all escaped war-torn countries and fled across Europe from non-EU countries.  David Cameron made a massive error of judgement in 2015 referring to them as a swarm, and he was heavily criticised for it. The worrying narrative But it had been no mistaken comment: it was all part of a worrying developing narrative.  In August 2015 Cameron openly stated that we needed to take greater control over the number of refugees into the UK.  Somewhat cynically, this issue was …

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Jeremy Corbyn, Immigration and Brexit

In All, Brexit, Refugees, UK Immigration by Adam

Jeremy Corbyn has won his leadership: now he needs to win his party Jeremy Corbyn won the second clearest indication of the backing of voters over the weekend when he secured his leadership.  His popularity has always been based on the fact that he appears honest, straight forward, and stands up for what he believes in.  Above all, when you ask him a question you get a straight answer.  That’s new to British politics, and it could be seen as quite telling that his biggest opponents are other MPs. As a result, many people who support Corbyn tend to agree with his views on Brexit and immigration. He is also  well known for building relations with troublesome Eastern leaders, which has led to much criticism.  Ironically, many who criticise that fail to see the irony that they are holding hands …

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Settlement for Partners in the UK: a fair deal?

In All, Brexit, Settlement Visa by Adam

As the UK looms ever closer to Brexit, the general feeling towards immigration continues to be negative. Brexit voters might not have what they thought they wanted.  Further stringent controls on applying for settlement visas for partners could be on the way, especially for EU nationals. It appears that “love” is not part of the Brexit plan. What seems very hard to understand is just how cold and calculated the entire matter is. When it comes to trade and business deals it is understandable, but surely more thought should be put into people fighting to get their loved ones to the UK.  It’s a complicated process, too. It might look simple on the surface but currently it costs non-EEA families a small fortune. There is an increasing need to meet high financial criteria, and the Home Office will find any tiny …

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Safety Pins, Flags and Badges: Solidarity or “Slacktivism”?

In All, Brexit, Immigration, Society by Adam

Mass murder, genocide, war, terrorist attacks…whatever it is that happens, so many of us feel compelled to show our “solidarity” with the victims and take to social media. That’s it. For most people, that is the extent of their activism.  It is the limit of their statement of solidarity.  As long as they have been seen to do that, then they are satisfied with themselves. There’s no question that symbolism is an extremely powerful tool, especially when we consider something as poignant as the poppies worn for armistice.  Symbols carry with them an extension of meaning that goes beyond the literal and makes connections with personal and social values. Their connotations are dependent on culture and interpretation, so wearing a symbol is not the same as seeing a symbol².  A cross means something very different for the Christian wearing it than it …

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Marriage Mixed with Melancholy: will star-crossed lovers ever be fully accepted?

In All, Society by Adam

“All Animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” The twentieth century saw a wave of change in civil liberties and equality.  Women gained far more rights and independence, giving them more of a voice and a choice in their own lives. Unless, we look back to the 1940s and examine what happened to those few wishing to enter a mixed marriage. George Orwell’s satire of Stalinist Russia was published in the mid 1940s after having been rejected many times over by British and American publishers. Animal Farm has been held in high regard in the UK ever since in both English and History lessons. Throughout World War 2, soldiers fought and died beside comrades of many races and cultural heritages. They had a common enemy epitomised for his taste for ethnic cleansing.  Looking back, it almost …

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Overseas Students Count: but should they be Counted?

In All, Student Visas, Tier 4 by Adam

The argument about overseas students being counted in migration statistics is another one of those debates that is essentially more about point-scoring than it is of any real use. If the students are removed from the stats it would facilitate a sudden massive drop in migration numbers. However, it would also give a very skewed idea of the real number of people migrating to the UK. When overseas students, especially at higher education level, come to the UK they have to pay astonishingly high tuition fees. They also have to pay for their visa applications, and of course cover all the costs of the physical move. So it is fair to say they truly invest in their education, and they do so – in the most part – with every intention of applying that education to their lives and careers. These …

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Banking on Brexit: is it time to Invest in the UK?

In All, Brexit, Invest in the UK, Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visas by Adam

I am no expert when it comes to stocks and shares and all the jargon that goes with the financial markets. However, with even a layman’s eye, it looks like this could be a good time to invest in the UK. With a weaker pound, and a buyer’s market developing, investment opportunities for 2017 are emerging since Brexit. It’s important to see through the fog of politics that Brexit is causing because at the moment no-one knows what the final deal will be with regards to trading. More importantly, no-one knows how this will affect immigration from EU and EEA countries, which affects work-forces and trade from EU countries. However, the UK has always had more of its net migration from non-EU/EEA countries, and it is unlikely that this will change anyway. Some of the really big corporate players are considering moving …

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UK Visa Fees 2017

In All, Tier 2, UK Visa Fees by Adam

All the recent action with the Brexit White Paper, parliamentary votes, and the beginning of Trump’s presidency causing ripples from overseas, make is easy to lose sight of other issues affecting UK immigration. One of the most significant is the update to UK Visa Fees 2017. New rules are set for April of this year, and it is fair to say that some people will be less than reassured. Whether the increases and changes that are being brought in are supposed to generate more income for the Home Office or to try and curb immigration is impossible to tell. However, it is clear that some element of “border control” is being applied in order to appease the millions who voted Brexit on the back of that issue. When looking at the changes it is very easy to see them as completely oppressive and …

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Overseas Students Count: but should they be Counted?

In All, Student Visas, Tier 4 by Adam

The argument about overseas students being counted in migration statistics is another one of those debates that is essentially more about point-scoring than it is of any real use. If the students are removed from the stats it would facilitate a sudden massive drop in migration numbers. However, it would also give a very skewed idea of the real number of people migrating to the UK. When overseas students, especially at higher education level, come to the UK they have to pay astonishingly high tuition fees. They also have to pay for their visa applications, and of course cover all the costs of the physical move. So it is fair to say they truly invest in their education, and they do so – in the most part – with every intention of applying that education to their lives and careers. These …

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UK Visa Refusal: Ten Reasons Why visas are Refused

In All, UK Immigration, Visa Refusals by Adam

Having a Visa application refused can be a confusing, frustrating, and upsetting experience. It always feels personal, and always seems judgemental – as well as unfair. The truth is that a UK Visa refusal is a regular occurrence, and the Home Office have no problem handing them out. After all: the Home Office keeps the visa fees from all applications whether is successful or not, so they make more money from appeals and further applications. We are often asked how to “guarantee” that a visa will be accepted. The simple answer is: you can’t get a 100% guarantee, because the Home Office are final decision makers. What you can do, however, is make sure your application as strong it can absolutely be. To help you in this, we have compiled a list 10 of the most common reasons* the Home …

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Polar Politics

In All, Brexit, UK Immigration by Adam

President Trump. Seriously? I don’t think the world was really expecting it to happen. But now that it has, we need to take it extremely seriously.  Don’t get me wrong – I don’t mean we should take Donald Trump any more seriously now than when he stood at the podium being racist, misogynistic, bigoted and defamatory.  However, thinking about what it says of the way we enact our limited powers in democracy is something that we should consider carefully. Polar Opposites Don’t Attract Good Debate Just as with Brexit, when you give people a simple “in or out,” “yes or no,” or “blue or orange” choice in political decisions they tend to polarise all the other connecting issues.  For example, if healthcare is discussed it becomes contested as an “either/or” option, with no room between. The complexities in its delivery, …

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Jeremy Corbyn, Immigration and Brexit

In All, Brexit, Refugees, UK Immigration by Adam

Jeremy Corbyn has won his leadership: now he needs to win his party Jeremy Corbyn won the second clearest indication of the backing of voters over the weekend when he secured his leadership.  His popularity has always been based on the fact that he appears honest, straight forward, and stands up for what he believes in.  Above all, when you ask him a question you get a straight answer.  That’s new to British politics, and it could be seen as quite telling that his biggest opponents are other MPs. As a result, many people who support Corbyn tend to agree with his views on Brexit and immigration. He is also  well known for building relations with troublesome Eastern leaders, which has led to much criticism.  Ironically, many who criticise that fail to see the irony that they are holding hands …

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Home is Where the Heart Aches (Part 2): Priceless Bridges

In All, Immigration, UK Immigration Solicitors by Adam

It has always amazed me how few people stop to consider the sheer weight of the decision that most immigrants have to face when they leaves their home and come to the UK.  Regardless of whether they want to stay for just a few years or on a permanent basis, they still leave behind their home, family, friends, and whole lives. We are lucky in the UK that ever since World War Two, there has never been any real threat to our home land other than a comparatively tiny number of incidents in comparison to all the cold wars across the world. We have seen more terrorism delivered by conflict with Ireland (the IRA) than from any other specific group, despite what the media would have you believe.  Other than the rare threat to our safety, the UK is an …

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Partner Places in the UK – surely not “Sold out”

In All, Brexit, UK Visa Charges by Adam

Sometimes all that matters is getting to be with your partner; the one you love. Getting a visa for your loved one is not a simple task in the UK. The Home Office charges a lot of money for applications and then look for the slightest detail to refuse them.  Brexit is clearly going to make it harder for everyone as the Government becomes more desperate to reduce numbers of immigration. Further controls for partner visa’s could be on the way when Brexit finally begins, too. It’s almost as if “love” is not part of the plan for the UK. The whole system can seem cruel, and you have to be ready to literally prove that your relationship is genuine. A couple might also find it difficult to meet strict financial criteria and documentary evidence requirements. All that Brexit is …

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UK Visa Fees 2017

In All, Tier 2, UK Visa Fees by Adam

All the recent action with the Brexit White Paper, parliamentary votes, and the beginning of Trump’s presidency causing ripples from overseas, make is easy to lose sight of other issues affecting UK immigration. One of the most significant is the update to UK Visa Fees 2017. New rules are set for April of this year, and it is fair to say that some people will be less than reassured. Whether the increases and changes that are being brought in are supposed to generate more income for the Home Office or to try and curb immigration is impossible to tell. However, it is clear that some element of “border control” is being applied in order to appease the millions who voted Brexit on the back of that issue. When looking at the changes it is very easy to see them as completely oppressive and …

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Refugees and the poisonous narrative

In All, Refugees, Uncategorized by Adam

The UK has been dragging its heels on the refugee crisis for well over a year now. It is almost impossible to know how many refugees have fled the east from Syria and other countries, by land and by sea.  However, even though the number is unclear, what we do know is that the variety is not. Men, women and children have all escaped war-torn countries and fled across Europe from non-EU countries.  David Cameron made a massive error of judgement in 2015 referring to them as a swarm, and he was heavily criticised for it. The worrying narrative But it had been no mistaken comment: it was all part of a worrying developing narrative.  In August 2015 Cameron openly stated that we needed to take greater control over the number of refugees into the UK.  Somewhat cynically, this issue was …

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The Appeal of the UK: the cost of Freedom and Liberty

In All, Appeals, Brexit, Immigration, Uncategorized by Adam

Buried deep beneath the murky underwater of the issue of migration in the UK is a more troubling trend in the cost of justice in the UK.  Filing a visa application is hard enough without having to worry about the cost of funding an an appeal if the visa is refused. It appears that “freedom” and “liberty” have a price. Migration brings an approximate net wealth of about £2billion a year to the UK, so despite some claims to the contrary, it is not a drain on the economy or the public purse. Brexit might well have provided some hope for people who want a more EU-red-tape-free society, but the cost is an entirely different matter.  Some of the migration rules that apply to non-EU or non-EEA countries could start affecting EU migration.  In fact, this is what people are …

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What’s the Point of Immigration Control?

In All, Brexit, Uncategorized by Adam

The point of Australian rules is not just for football… The “Brexit” campaign really turned up the volume on cries for a Australian, points-based immigration system .  People wanted to know why we don’t have one, when we are going to get one, and when we are going to use it. Um. Well…we do have one.  We have had it for over 8 years. It currently only applies to non-EU migrants, and no-one knows what will happen to EU migration after the UK exits the EU.  In reality no-one really knows much about what a post “Brexit” Britain will look like. One of the main problems is a misunderstanding of the true effects of immigration on UK society.  It has become fashionable to scapegoat immigrants as the source of all evil.  The housing shortage, over-filled schools, and strain on the …

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UK Visa Refusal: Ten Reasons Why visas are Refused

In All, UK Immigration, Visa Refusals by Adam

Having a Visa application refused can be a confusing, frustrating, and upsetting experience. It always feels personal, and always seems judgemental – as well as unfair. The truth is that a UK Visa refusal is a regular occurrence, and the Home Office have no problem handing them out. After all: the Home Office keeps the visa fees from all applications whether is successful or not, so they make more money from appeals and further applications. We are often asked how to “guarantee” that a visa will be accepted. The simple answer is: you can’t get a 100% guarantee, because the Home Office are final decision makers. What you can do, however, is make sure your application as strong it can absolutely be. To help you in this, we have compiled a list 10 of the most common reasons* the Home …

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Listing Foreign Workers: No Better than the Third Reich?

In All, Brexit, Work Visa by Adam

The world seems to have darkened of late in relation to the way leading countries are talking about migration.  Donald Trump is trying his hardest to stir up an anti-Muslim and anti-Mexican stance overseas.  And yet in our own country, the Home Secretary has stated the intention to force companies to publish lists of foreign workers as if they need to watched carefully. When did the word “foreign” become so dirty (again)? Why should an employer be any more accountable for a “foreign” worker than anyone else?  By all means, it is important that migrant workers on a non-permanent visa have the correct paperwork.  Continue to check that people are eligible to live and work in the UK at the point of application, but what is the need to go any further? A Backwards Step However, the Home secretary’s speech …

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Walking the NHS into the light: what will a post Brexit NHS look like?

In All, Brexit, Immigration Politics, Work Visa by Adam

Immigration – a burden on NHS recruitment? The burden on the NHS was one of the major issues used as a reason to leave the EU in the recent referendum. Brexit was proposed as one of the solutions as the numbers of immigrants stayed far higher than limits set by the government. Promises of £350m a week were made, and then quickly squirmed out of. Let’s assume a certain bus got a re-spray. This was linked to education and housing in an attempt to make Brexit sound like the only viable solution. However, the NHS has suffered greatly under Conservative power for many years. Substantial and regular cuts have challenged staff numbers in particular. Hospital or department closures have been widespread; redundancies growing; and serious problems in recruitment are brewing. Part of this includes the removal of the training bursary …

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